7 Places In The World Where It's Illegal to Die

Who could’ve thought that even being dead could be a problem? Yes, you read that right! Certain places around the world forbid people from dying as it's illegal. Read below to know why these places are so weird:

1. Biritiba Mirim - Brazil

Cemetery

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Located in the state of Sao Paulo, Biritiba Mirim had a capacity of only 50,000 gravesites. This caused overcrowding of crypts as they were forced to be shared. The mayor of the town took an extreme step and filed a public bill to make it illegal for people to die in 2005. If a person died, their relatives would be targeted to pay fines or even spend jail time as punishments to be able to make more space for tombstones.

2. Itsukushima – Japan

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Itsukushima or ‘Miyajima’, a UNESCO Heritage site located in Japan is also known as ‘Shrine Island’. The island is given the name because it is considered to be a holy god itself and is home to many shrines and temples. So, to maintain the sanctity of the place ‘dedicated to the gods’, no deaths or births have been allowed on the island since 1978. In fact, no hospitals or cemeteries have been built here at all.

3. Lanjarón - Spain

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In 1999, the mayor of the town of Lanjaron banned death since the local cemetery was too full and the souls of the dead would be unable to rest in peace. Located in the Granada province, this step was carried out partly as a joke and partly as a political move to grab attention to the fact. As the ban was real, the population of 4,000 was advised to remain healthy until a new graveyard was built.

4. Le Lavandou – France

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A commune in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur région, known for its beaches and postcard views is another place with a cemetery that is at full capacity. The law was passed in 2000, forbidding people from dying within the town.

5. Longyearbyen - Norway

Longyearbyen Grave
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Longyearbyen is a small town in Norway known for coal mining. Being located so close to the Arctic Circle, the weather usually reaches freezing temperatures and the permafrost prevents the dead bodies from decomposing which in turn increases the probability of spreading transferable diseases to the living. So, as a rule, it is against the law to die and be buried in Longyearbyen. And in case, someone is nearing their death, they are taken to the mainland and other parts of Norway where such a law doesn’t exist!

6. Sarpourenx - France 

Grave in Sarpourenx
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In 2008, Sarpourenx was ordered by a mayoral decree forbidding the resident's right to death unless they somehow already owned a spot for burial in the congested cemetery. The municipal order threatened severe punishment for lawbreakers. This action was further a symbolic protest from the mayor’s side as a judge had ruled against taking over private farmland for expanding purposes of the cemetery.

7. Sellia - Italy

Sellia in Italy
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Sellia is a village in the Calabria region of Southern Italy, where 65% of the population of only 560 residents is over the age of 65. A decree was passed banning the residents from even falling sick (forget dying) to protect its diminishing population in 2015. The details ordered the older age population to resist death and although it was a strict way of enforcing the message for people to stay healthy, this seemed like the only way for the mayor to get the residents to become fit.

So weird? Sooo weird! SMH!
Let us know what you think in the comments below.

This post was published by Malvika Kumar

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