Weather :

Timings : 8 AM to 1 PM
4 PM to 10 PM
On Fridays, the market only operates in the afternoons

Entry Fee : .

Mutrah Souk, Muscat Overview

Mutrah Souq is one of the oldest markets in the Arab world. This antiquity has perhaps increased its beauty, magic and allure. Mutrah Souk or Al Alam Souk has been named after darkness because the crowded stalls and lanes do not allow the sun rays to infiltrate through during the day and the shoppers need lamplights to see where they were going. The market used to be a source of supply for Omanis where they could buy their needs in the 1960s for simpler life requirements.

In addition to local products like fruits, vegetables, textiles and dates, there were imported goods too. The souk sells traditional textiles, garments, jewellery, incense, frankincense, pipes, pottery and craftwork. Purchase souvenirs like Khanjars and coffee pots, Bedouin jewellery, and clothing (dishdashas, kummas (caps), massar (turban) and khanjar for the men; dishdashas, surwal (trousers), lihaff (shawl) for the women).

Mutrah Souk has narrow winding alleys roofed with wood. Among the local Omanis, this souk is called the Market of Darkness, with its myriad of alleys and roads lined by shops that block the sun during the day. This name applies to the section that extends from the Prophet's Mosque to Khawr Bimbah. The east and west parts of Mutrah Souk, separated by Khawr Bimbah, are also known as 'the small market' and 'the large market'. The Market of Darkness is the small market, whereas the large market is the wholesale market.

Photos of Mutrah Souk

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What to Buy at Mutrah Souk

The marketplace is wonderfully aromatic and comes alive with its many isles and alleys with uncountable stalls. here is a list of what you must buy when at Mutrah Souk:
  • Fragrances: Make your senses buzz with the heady concoction of fragrances of frankincense, perfume oils, attar, fresh jasmine and spices.
  • Clothes: Embroidered clothes, headscarves, hijabs, and other garments can be found in the small shops that line the marketplace.
  • Antiques: While some stalls are stacked up with Indian antiques, Omani antiques, and gold decorations, others are piled with brightly coloured spices and powdered dyes.
  • Gold: The souk has numerous gold shops located west of the main entrance, and the entire street seems filled with gold and silver jewellery.

Food at Mutrah Souk

When you are done walking around, exploring and shopping, stop for a delicious meal at any of the restaurants lining the promenade. Visit popular Omani restaurant Bait Al Luban which translates as 'house of frankincense' and serves a delicious Omani shuwa: slow-cooked pulled lamb with Omani spices.

Best Time to Visit

The Souk is best enjoyed when you can take your time to take all the sights, sounds, and smells in. It is least crowded in the mornings and late afternoon and busiest in the evening hours after 6 PM. The main north-south thoroughfare becomes livelier after dark. Join the exciting marketplace atmosphere or watch it all go by from a seat in a coffee shop. The souk tends to get crowded during Eid season as Omanis, and people from all over the country come here to shop for garments and jewellery.

How To Reach Mutrah Souk

The market’s main gate is the one directly opposite the Mutrah Corniche, and it has another gate in the old city, which receives the most visitors who come from other parts of Oman and its villages. The gates will be marked. It will be difficult to find parking near the bustling lanes, so come by public transport like taxis or a bus instead.  It will be easy enough to find the entrance. However, the maze of shops inside the souk will be difficult to navigate. That said, getting lost inside the souk is part of the fun.

Tips For Visiting Mutrah Souk

As with all trips to traditional souks and bazaars, haggling is essential. You can find really good bargains for quality products. Because of Oman's consumer protection laws, you will be quoted reasonable prices, but many shopkeepers will be willing to give you bargains for more the expensive items. All shopkeepers appreciate a healthy haggle.  However, most of the discounts will tend to be slight.

Stay out of the historic Shiite district of Al Lawataya; it is walled to protect the privacy of the residents, and a signboard under the archway also requests visitors to keep out.  

Navigating the souk will take a bit of practice, especially if it’s your first time visiting a souk as chaotic and crowded as Mutrah Souk. Keep turning right at each junction; you will come back to the sea. If you are in any doubt, head downhill. Locals are friendly so you can ask for directions. It is extremely safe and coming across a pickpocket, or a con-artist is unheard-of.

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