Indonesia Tourism


Ideal duration: 9-12 days

Currency: Indonesian Rupiah (IDR)

Best time: April - September (Read More)

Budget: Budget trip: IDR 219,048 per day,
Mid-Range trip: IDR 596,827 per day,
Luxury trip: IDR 1,753,669 per day

Ad

"Where culture meets nature"

Indonesia Tourism

Remember when you scrolled past a picture of your friend enjoying the sea in Bali, surfing her worries away as you binged watched every episode of FRIENDS, yet again? Yes, Indonesia is THAT place where you imagine yourself unwinding and relaxing under the shade of trees, beside the sea and around the rice fields. Indonesia is a small yet wonderful country packed with surprises around every corner. The people are very welcoming too.

Best time to visit Indonesia

April - September is the best time to visit Indonesia

The best time to visit Indonesia is during its dry season that lasts from mid-April to September. The weather in this tropical country can be split into two seasons - dry and wet. Indonesia experiences its wet season in the remaining months from October to mid-April. The dry season has warm, sunny and dry days that offer the perfect conditions for trekking, sightseeing or other water-related activities. May, June and September are the ideal months to visit Indonesia if you wish to combine the excellent weather of the dry season with the lack of tourist crowds.

In regions like Kalimantan and Bali, the difference between the dry and wet season is not as extreme. The central Molucca islands experience contrastingly different weather conditions and make for a suitable destination if planning a trip in January. Temperatures throughout Indonesia are relatively consistent and hover around 28 degrees Celsius, irrespective of the time of the year. A surge in tourists is witnessed from mid-June to mid-September, whereas the wet season sees a drastic drop in tourist activity.

Holidify's Opinion

  What's Great?

Cheap, Natural beauty, Lot of History and Culture

  What's not so Great?

Crowded

For Whom

Adventure enthusiasts, Culture buffs

Indonesia Packages

Compare quotes from upto 3 travel agents for free

  • Beautiful Bali Vacation

    ₹ 12,500 onwards

    CUSTOMIZE & GET QUOTES

  • Alluring Bali Package

    ₹ 13,900 onwards

    CUSTOMIZE & GET QUOTES

  • Neverending Romance in Bali

    ₹ 48,990 onwards

    CUSTOMIZE & GET QUOTES


View All Packages for Indonesia >

More on Indonesia


Indonesia is still very much a cash-based society, and credit cards are still not accepted in many places. In regional and remote areas, the most common bank is BRI. In regional and remote areas, the most common bank is BRI. In Bali, USD is acceptable in many places but the exchange rate may be higher or lower than those of the banks.

There are several money exchange shops right in the Indonesian airport, and in all the tourist areas on the island. This makes changing money very convenient. The safest place to exchange currency in Bali is the local bank. You are less likely to be ripped off when you exchange currency at a local bank. To minimize the Foreign Exchange Transaction fee, make sure to withdraw cash from your bank’s ATM, or an ATM that has international services. Ask your hotel’s front desk if they allow currency exchanges. If you get your currency exhanged at money changing shops, then make sure that the shop is an authorized one.

Indonesian cuisine often demonstrates complex flavour,acquired from certain ingredients and bumbu spices mixture. Indonesian dishes have rich flavours; most often described as savoury, hot and spicy, and also combination of basic tastes such as sweet, salty, sour and bitter. Some of the most famous Indonesian dishes which you must try are: Nasi Goreng (fried rice), Soto Betawi (beef soup with cow milk), Rendang (dry curry), Satay (skewered and grilled chicken with peanut sauce), Gudeg (jack fruit with palm sugar, coconut milk, meat, garlic, and lots of spices).

Indonesian cuisine caters to both vegetarian and non vegetarian food equally. There is a lot of stir-fried, stewed, curried vegetables available and complimentary to rice. As far as Indian restaurants are concerned, there are quite a few in Jakarta and Bali. Some of which are: (Jakarta) Satoo, Queen's Tandoor, Ganesha ek Sanskriti, Eastern Promise. (Bali): Malaika Secret Moksha, Atithi Indian Contemporary Restro and Bar, NU Delhi, Spice Mantra. However, if you are Jain then you might find it very difficult to find food with the needed restrictions, however there is a restaurant in Kuta which is known for it's Jain food, it's called Queen's of India.

There is no one unified Indonesian culture as such, but the Hindu culture of the former Majapahit empire does provide a framework for many of the cultural traditions found across the central islands of Sumatra, Java, Bali and Lombok.Modern-day Indonesian popular culture is largely dominated by the largest ethnic group, the Javanese. Islam, however is the largest biggest followed in Indonesia, with a population of 80% of its people being Muslim.

Bahasa Indonesian. Some important phrases are: Berapa harganya? = what does it cost/how much is it? Jam berapa? = what time is it? Di mana? = where? How to get there? = Bagaimana caranya kesana? What is it? = Apa ini? Is there money changer around here? = Di mana tempat penukaran uang di sekitar sini? Good morning (until 11am) - Selamat pagi [se-lah-mutt par-ghee] Good afternoon (until 3pm) - Selamat siang [se-la-mutt see-ahng] Good evening (until 6pm) - Selamat sore [se-la-mutt sore-ray]"

As far as nightlife is concerned, Bali and Jakarta are the best options. Typical hours start after sunset. Kuta, Seminyak and Legian feature life after dark at its most liveliest. Standalone entertainment venues such as District Bali and the Hard Rock Cafe in Kuta feature occasional gigs from international bands. Bali’s fine collection of beach clubs, such as Ku De Ta, Potato Head, Mozaic and Cocoon spice up the splendid sunny coastlines. While those looking for an alternative way to spend their nights may opt for quieter Nusa Dua, Sanur or Ubud. In Jakarta, Jenja, Immigrant, Dragonfly, Empirica are some of the most famous nightclubs. Read more about Nightlife in Jakarta.

Indonesia's shopping scene is legendary and if you are a first time visitor, you're never going to forget this experience. From sorting through hand-painted batiks to picking and choosing home décor and furnitures, Indonesia has everything to offer. If you are in the mood for splurging, then head down to south Bali to purge yourself. If you're looking to spend on home decor then head to Saya Gallery or Kharisma Antiques in Bali. Take a day trip to Ubud’s Teba Sari plantation to buy coffee beans, aromatherapy products and local herbs and spices. In Jakarta, a small shop located at expat area, Kemang, sells Asian art and decorations. It’s a great place to go shopping for home decorations. Read more about Shopping in Bali and Shopping in Jakarta

Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor (ideally, 4-6 weeks) before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need. Some of the vaccines that you may require are: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, Typhoid, Japanese Encephalitis, Malaria, Rabies, Yellow Fever.

Never use your left hand for anything. Don't touch anyone with it, don't eat with it, don't pick things up with it. Remember to remove your shoes or sandals at the door to a house, and don't show the soles of your feet to anyone. Use your right thumb to point at things - pointing with the index finger is considered rude. Always bend slightly when meeting or greeting an Indonesian older than you or in a position of authority.

Besides your clothes, make sure you carry a bug spray, suncreen and some aloe vera gel for some after sun soothing. Also, make sure that you carry a universal charger. Remember to be sensitive towards the people's religious sentiments. When visiting Bali, remember to dress properly when visiting temples, cover your feet and shoulders.


Add a Review

No reviews yet

Ask a question from people who travelled to Indonesia recently

Be the first to add a question