Halasuru Someshwara Temple

Weather :

Timings : Morning: 06:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Evening: 05:30 PM - 09:00 PM

Time Required : 1 - 2 hrs

Entry Fee : No Entry Fee

Halasuru Someshwara Temple, Bangalore Overview

Located in the suburbs of Halasuru (Ulsoor) in Bangalore, Halasuru Someshwara Temple is dedicated to the Hindu deity Shiva. Dating back to the Chola period, the temple is the oldest in all of Bangalore. Built in around the 12th and the 13th centuries by the Hoysalas, the temple is now managed and maintained by the Endowment Department of the Karnataka government. However, major modifications and additions to the temple were made during the Vijayanagar empire. Besides the several other notable features of the temple, the most fascinating are the elaborate sculptures of Ravana holding the Kailash Parvat to please Lord Shiva, Goddess Durga slaying Mahishasura (a demon), scenes from the wedding of Lord Shiva and Parvati, images of the Saptarishis etc.

Constructed in the Vijayanagar style of architecture, the shrine has notable beautiful carvings on the walls and placid interiors. Other than the main temple, the premises are dotted with smaller shrines of other deities including Kamakshamma, Arunachaleswara, Bhimeswara, Nanjundeswara and Panchalingeswara. The temple is one of the most popular places of attraction in Bangalore and is especially flocked by a significant number of tourists at the time of Mahashivrathri. The devotees believe that the Hindu gods Brahma and Vishnu also worshipped in this temple.

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Etymology of Halasuru Someshwara Temple

Benjamin Lewis Rice, the British historian and educationist, describes the legend behind the consecration of the temple in “Gazetter of Mysore”, 1887 edition. As per the myth, King Kempe Gowda of the Vijanayagar Empire, rode far away on a hunt and came to rest under a tree on a hot sultry day. While resting he fell asleep and met the local deity Someshwara in his dreams. Someshwara told the king to build a temple in his honour using the buried treasure; he promised the King divine favor on following his orders. The King did as he was asked, he found the treasure and built a temple on the spot.

However, there are different versions of the story as well. One of which suggests that the temple was built by King Jayappa Gowda, following the instructions of a man that appeared in his dream and asked him to retrieve the linga (symbol of God Shiva) buried under the exact spot where the king was sleeping, and a build a temple at the same place. While some attribute the construction of the temple to the Chola period.

Architecture of Halasuru Someshwara Temple

The temple is mostly built on the designs and patterns of the famous Vijayanagar architectural style. The square sanctum (garbgriha) or the place of worship, surrounded by a narrow passageway is connected to a closed hall (mantapa). The mantapa is beautifully enhanced with the help of rectangular pedestals aka pilasters and frieze sculptures. This hall is closely followed by an open hall (open mantapa) consisting of forty- eight pillars and several bays. The monumental gatehouse tower called gopuram stands right infront, which is built in a typical 16th century style. Both the gate tower and the pillars are bedecked with intricate carvings of the divine deities.

Tips For Visiting Halasuru Someshwara Temple

1. Leave your footwear at the chappal stand and not at the door of the temple.
2. Photography is not allowed in the interiors.
3. There are more than 10 temple shrines inside the complex; if you wish to make donations, keep loose coins ready.
4. Visitors are requested to dress modestly. The temple doesn't allow entry in short (for both men and women). We recommend you to dress in traditional Indian clothes.

How To Reach Halasuru Someshwara Temple

Bangalore is well- connected by metro lines; the nearest metro station to Halasuru Someshwara Temple is Halasuru, falling on the purple line. After getting down at the metro station, you can walk down to the shrine; it is hardly 500 metres. Alternatively, hiring a private taxi cab is the easiest option but is slightly expensive. You can also choose to travel in the state run city buses which cover all of the city.

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