Food of Petra

Eating options include both international and local Bedouin cuisine available both in budget and elegant restaurants. The local cuisine is elaborate with a focus on grain, cheese, yogurt, vegetables, and poultry. Vegetarian options are available though the main courses are primarily non-vegetarian. Meals often start with Mezze, an appetizer including hummus (chick peas boiled and blended with tahini paste, garlic, olive oil, and lemon juice), Kubbeh (minced meat with herbs covered with crushed wheat and fried), Falafel (fried balls of chickpea flour with spices), salads such as Fattoush, and Araęyes (mincemeat filled oven baked flatbread sandwich). A very popular main dish, considered the national dish, is Mansaf _ rice, lamb and rehydrated yogurt. It is eaten on special occasions, weddings, and festivals. Other main dishes include Fatet Batinjan (Labaneh, roasted eggplant, and minced meat), Galayet Bandora (tomato based), Suniyat Dijaj (chicken baked with tomatoes, potatoes, and onions), Zarb (meat and vegetables cooked in underground pit), Makloubeh (casserole of layers of meat, rice, and vegetables) and kofta in tahini sauce. These are served with breads such as Kubz (like pita), Shrak (thin bread baked on a griddle) and Abud (dense bread).Traditional sweets include Kanfeh (gooey white cheese base with semolina and covered in sweet syrup), Halawa (sweetened tahini sesame paste with dry fruits), Harisa (semolina based cake in sweet syrup). Oriental sweets as Baklawa, Mabrumeh, and Asabea are also popular. Tea (shy) ranging from black to herbal is widely available and popular. Coffee (gahweh) is either Turkish variety (cardamom flavoured) or Arabic (greenish liquid). Alcohol is available in larger hotels and upmarket restaurants.

Food for Indians in Petra

There are enough vegetarian options in the local and international cuisines for it not to be a major issue, should you or anyone in your travel group be a vegetarian.

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