Wildlife Institute of India

The government of India has a special provision for the wildlife enthusiasts under the name of 'Wildlife Institute Of India', abbreviated as WII. It's an autonomous institute managed by the Ministry of Environment Forest and Climate change, Government of India. For the ones whose mind is full of wilderness, eyes wait for the motion in the jungle, and their heart pounds for adventure, the Wildlife Institute is like their dream come true. 

Where is Wildlife Institute of India Located?

View from Wildlife Institute of India
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The fragrance of the sandalwood, the canopy of the trees, surrounded by Himalayan foothills with a sober spirit of Buddhism. A classic vibe surrounds you when you step in Dehradun. Wildlife Institute of India is located in Chandrabani, which is close to the southern forests of Dehradun. An apt site for the one who wishes to embrace the beauty of wildlife and experience a sound sleep on the lap of nature.

Biodiversity in Wildlife Institute of India

Biodiversity at Wildlife Institute of India
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Wildlife Institute of India is the gem in the crown for this city. Lush green grassy Sal forests support 556 floras and 600 faunas which includes reptiles, mammals, butterflies, fish, amphibians, birds, moths, etc. India's rich biodiversity helps the sprouting wildlife photographers to pave their new career paths. 

Some Facts About Wildlife Institute of India

WII is famous for its vast database which counts for 400 bibliographic references on Indian elephants, 1K references on crocodiles, etc. It focuses on different cat species and their problems. A cat person can do complete research on these references.

Vision- Mission- Goal
As every school diary is occupied with the three main pillars: Vision, mission and goal, this institute comes up with a riveting one which says - Working towards the development of wildlife science and promoting conservation and protection, going hand in hand with cultural and socio-economic activities. 

For the growing researchers in town, Wildlife Institute of India carries out wildlife research in areas of study like:

Biodiversity
Endangered Species
Wildlife Policy
Wildlife Management
Wildlife Forensics
Spatial Modelling
Eco-development
Habitat Ecology
Climate Change
Forensics, Remote Sensing and GIS, Laboratory, Herbarium, and an Electronic Library are the spheres of research too.

This paves a path for an enormous amount of research fields for a person whose agenda in life is simple:

The Investigation, Experimentation and Exploration

A researcher can see what everyone else can see, but he can think about what nobody else's has ever imagined. Wildlife Institute of India is a place which offers a legitimate chance for well-facilitated student life. One can find all the records, live flora and fauna, efficient labs and many more facilities required to complete the research.

Defenders of Wildlife

Wildlife institute of India
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The Wildlife Institute of India stands out from the crowd by depicting its significant role in tiger protection and conservation act. It has set up the country's first tiger cell in the institute under the affiliation of NTCA (National tiger conservation act). They'll maintain a database for all the living tigers to keep a strict check over poaching and hunting cases.

This is where the Wildlife Institute of India rests in this article, but to be more realistic, it's just the beginning. WII is always restless. Busy with keeping a count, conducting surveys, research, giving shape to new wildlife enthusiasts, taking a stand for India and more. This Institute is different. It cannot be put into words. Maybe visiting WII could calm down your curiosities or perhaps it can result in a sudden hike of love for Wildlife and Nature. Taking a sweet risk to taste a new experience is worth no harm!

This post was published by Avani Raghuwanshi

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