Top View of Jwala Devi Temple, Kangra Temple Premises of Jwala Ji (Godess of Light), Kangra Inside View of Temple Sanctum, Jwala Devi Temple, Kangra

Jwala Devi Temple

Weather :

Timings : 5:00 AM - 10:00 PM (Summer)/ 6:00 AM - 9:00 PM (Winter)

Time Required : 1-2 hours

Entry Fee : No entry fee

Jwala Devi Temple, Kangra Overview

Located in the Kangra district of Himachal Pradesh, Jwala Devi Temple is dedicated to Jwala Ji - a Hindu Goddess depicted by a set of eternal flames. One of the 52 Shakti Peethas in India, it is believed that the tongue of Goddess Sati fell where the Jwala Devi Temple is now situated. A novel temple which does not have an idol, the five aartis conducted at Jwala Devi Temple are the main attraction.

It is believed that the Goddess resides in the holy flames of the temple, which miraculously burn day and night without any fuel from outside. The flames represent the nine forms of Goddess Durga - Mahakali, Annapurna, Chandi, Hinglaj, Vindhya Vasini, Mahalakshmi, Saraswati, Ambika and Anji Devi. Usually, an offering of Rabri is served to the Goddess. 

Located 1 km from the temple is Jwalamukhi Cave. Earlier having three openings, the cave now has a single opening and is filled with the water of a spring.

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Aarti Timings

Mangal Aarti- Summer: 5:00 AM - 6:00 AM, Winter: 6:00 AM - 7:00 AM
Panjupchaar Pujan- After Mangal Aarti 
Bhog Aarti- Summer: 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Winter: 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Evening Aarti- Summer: 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM, Winter: 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Shaiyan Aarti- Summer: 9:00 PM - 10:00 PM Winter: 8:00 PM - 9:00 PM

How To Reach Jwala Devi Temple

Regular buses are available from Kangra to the Jwala Devi temple. Visitors can also hire cabs if necessary.

Best Time to Visit Jwala Devi Temple

Navaratri is a popular time to visit this holy pilgrimage. The visitors might also keep in mind that the temple has colourful fairs in the months of March-April and September-October.

Legend of Jwala Devi Temple

According to legend, the Jwala Devi Temple of Kangra stands at the place where the fiery tongue of Goddess Sati fell when she sacrificed herself. The temple was built by Raja Bhumi Chand Katoch to enshrine the holy spot. It is said that the Pandavas also helped the king in making the grand temple. However, it was actually completed in the 19th century.

The story goes that, several thousand years ago, a cowherd found that one of his cows was always without milk. He followed the cow one day and saw a little girl coming out of the forest and drinking all the milk. He reported this to Raja Bhumi Chand who sent his soldiers into the woods to find the sacred spot where Ma Sati's tongue has fallen as he believed that the little girl somehow represented the goddess. After some years, the flames were found in the mountain and the king built a temple around it and named it Jwala Devi Temple. It is also fabled that the Pandavas visited this temple and renovated it. The folk song "Panjan Panjan Pandavan Tera Bhawan Banaya" lies testimony to this belief.

During the Mughal period, Akbar tried to extinguish the flames many times, but they kept on burning in all their divine glory. It is said that when a humbled Akbar went to pay his homage to the flames and offered a golden "chhatra" or umbrella to the Goddess, the gold turned into an unknown metal as a signal that the Goddess has refused his offering. The Jwala Devi Temple is one of the 51 Shakti Peethas and of immense religious importance to the Hindus.

Architecture of Jwala Devi Temple

  • The Jwala Devi temple follows an Indo-Sikh style of architecture. It is built on a wooden platform and is four-cornered with a small dome on the top.
  • There is a central square pit where the eternal flames burn. There are pits in front of the flames too where the flowers and other offerings are kept.
  • The dome and the spire of the temple were covered by gold which was gifted by Maharaja Ranjit Singh. Maharaja Kharak Singh, Ranjit Singh's son, gifted the silver which was used to cover the main door of the temple. The brass bell in front of the shrine was an offering by the King of Nepal.
  • The temple looks beautiful with its golden dome and silver doors glittering in the surrounding greenery. 

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